WASHINGTON, D.C. – Today, U.S. Senator Jacky Rosen (D-NV) released the following statement applauding news that the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) awarded 17 Tribes across Nevada grants totaling $14,654,255 to aid in the development and operation of low-income housing on tribal land.

“Access to affordable housing in tribal communities is an ongoing problem in Nevada, and across the country. Tribal communities have greater rates of homelessness than any other population in the United States,” said Senator Rosen. “I am glad to see that the Department of Housing and Urban Development allocated funds to address the shortage of affordable and safe housing options. These grants, which are a part of the Indian Housing Block Grant Program, can be used to develop, maintain, and operate safe and affordable housing and will provide Nevada’s Tribes with much-needed support.”

BACKGROUND: According to the National Alliance to End Homelessness’ State of Homelessness 2020, Native Americans and Pacific Islanders had the highest rates of homelessness when compared with other racial and ethnic groups, with an average of 160 Native American and Pacific Islanders experiencing homelessness out of every 10,000 compared to the national average of 17 out of every 10,000.

These grant funds will be divided amongst the Shoshone-Paiute Tribes of the Duck Valley Reservation, the Duckwater Shoshone Tribe, the Ely Shoshone Tribe, the Fallon Paiute-Shoshone Tribe, the Fort McDermitt Paiute and Shoshone Tribes, the Las Vegas Paiute Tribe, the Lovelock Paiute Tribe, the Moapa Band of Paiutes, the Pyramid Lake Paiute Tribe, the Reno-Sparks Indian Colony, the Summit Lake Paiute Tribe, the Te-Moak Tribe of Western Shoshone Indians, the Walker River Paiute Tribe, the Washoe Tribe of Nevada and California, the Winnemucca Indian Colony, the Yerington Paiute Tribe, and the Yomba Shoshone Tribe

The grants allocated by The Indian Housing Block Grant (IHBG) Competitive Grant Program provide federal funds for affordable housing activities in safe and healthy environments in Tribal communities and Native Alaskan villages.

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