WASHINGTON, D.C. – Today, U.S. Senator Jacky Rosen (D-NV), a member of the Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Committee (HSGAC), released a statement following the release of excerpts from a forthcoming Department of Justice (DOJ) Office of Inspector General (OIG) report on the Trump Administration’s family separation policy:

“The Administration’s family separation policy created a humanitarian crisis in our own country, with children ripped away from their parents and detained in horrifying conditions after fleeing to the U.S. to seek asylum,” said Senator Rosen. “Now, a government watchdog report reveals that U.S. government officials plotted to separate parents and children for the callous purpose of deterring migrants from lawfully seeking refuge in America. In its quest to send a message to immigrant families fleeing violence, the Administration implemented a cruel immigration agenda with no plan for reuniting families or ensuring children were safe while in the government’s care. I’m deeply troubled by the findings I’ve read from this report, and I am committed to working with my colleagues to enact reforms and ensure accountability.”

BACKGROUND: Last year, Rosen announced her co-sponsorship of the Keep Families Together Act. This legislation, introduced by Senator Dianne Feinstein and 45 other Senate colleagues, would ensure that the federal government carries out immigration procedures in the best interest of detained children.

Last month, during a hearing of the Senate Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Committee (HSGAC), U.S. Senator Jacky Rosen (D-NV) questioned Chad Wolf, the Trump Administration’s nominee to serve as Secretary of the Department of Homeland Security (DHS). During her questioning, Senator Rosen highlighted the egregious actions that occurred at DHS during Mr. Wolf’s time as Chief of Staff to a former DHS Secretary, as Under Secretary, and under his watch as Acting Secretary, including his direct involvement in the development and implementation of the child separation policy.

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